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 Irving’s performance was made in response to dialogue with newsagents in Plymouth. Reflecting on the EU Referendum, the artist aimed to listen and connect with people in the city. Irving constructed her own book fair structure from found furniture to display painted texts captured from her research.  Fox Irving is an artist who graduated from Camberwell College of Art. She works with the page and the book to explore language through words and paint. She has exhibited work both in the UK and in Europe and has been awarded the Bookartbookshop and London Centre for Book Arts awards.

Irving’s performance was made in response to dialogue with newsagents in Plymouth. Reflecting on the EU Referendum, the artist aimed to listen and connect with people in the city. Irving constructed her own book fair structure from found furniture to display painted texts captured from her research.

Fox Irving is an artist who graduated from Camberwell College of Art. She works with the page and the book to explore language through words and paint. She has exhibited work both in the UK and in Europe and has been awarded the Bookartbookshop and London Centre for Book Arts awards.

 Irving’s performance was made in response to dialogue with newsagents in Plymouth. Reflecting on the EU Referendum, the artist aimed to listen and connect with people in the city. Irving constructed her own book fair structure from found furniture to display painted texts captured from her research.  Fox Irving is an artist who graduated from Camberwell College of Art. She works with the page and the book to explore language through words and paint. She has exhibited work both in the UK and in Europe and has been awarded the Bookartbookshop and London Centre for Book Arts awards.

Irving’s performance was made in response to dialogue with newsagents in Plymouth. Reflecting on the EU Referendum, the artist aimed to listen and connect with people in the city. Irving constructed her own book fair structure from found furniture to display painted texts captured from her research.

Fox Irving is an artist who graduated from Camberwell College of Art. She works with the page and the book to explore language through words and paint. She has exhibited work both in the UK and in Europe and has been awarded the Bookartbookshop and London Centre for Book Arts awards.

 Irving’s performance was made in response to dialogue with newsagents in Plymouth. Reflecting on the EU Referendum, the artist aimed to listen and connect with people in the city. Irving constructed her own book fair structure from found furniture to display painted texts captured from her research.  Fox Irving is an artist who graduated from Camberwell College of Art. She works with the page and the book to explore language through words and paint. She has exhibited work both in the UK and in Europe and has been awarded the Bookartbookshop and London Centre for Book Arts awards.

Irving’s performance was made in response to dialogue with newsagents in Plymouth. Reflecting on the EU Referendum, the artist aimed to listen and connect with people in the city. Irving constructed her own book fair structure from found furniture to display painted texts captured from her research.

Fox Irving is an artist who graduated from Camberwell College of Art. She works with the page and the book to explore language through words and paint. She has exhibited work both in the UK and in Europe and has been awarded the Bookartbookshop and London Centre for Book Arts awards.

 Irving’s performance was made in response to dialogue with newsagents in Plymouth. Reflecting on the EU Referendum, the artist aimed to listen and connect with people in the city. Irving constructed her own book fair structure from found furniture to display painted texts captured from her research.  Fox Irving is an artist who graduated from Camberwell College of Art. She works with the page and the book to explore language through words and paint. She has exhibited work both in the UK and in Europe and has been awarded the Bookartbookshop and London Centre for Book Arts awards.

Irving’s performance was made in response to dialogue with newsagents in Plymouth. Reflecting on the EU Referendum, the artist aimed to listen and connect with people in the city. Irving constructed her own book fair structure from found furniture to display painted texts captured from her research.

Fox Irving is an artist who graduated from Camberwell College of Art. She works with the page and the book to explore language through words and paint. She has exhibited work both in the UK and in Europe and has been awarded the Bookartbookshop and London Centre for Book Arts awards.

 Irving’s performance was made in response to dialogue with newsagents in Plymouth. Reflecting on the EU Referendum, the artist aimed to listen and connect with people in the city. Irving constructed her own book fair structure from found furniture to display painted texts captured from her research.  Fox Irving is an artist who graduated from Camberwell College of Art. She works with the page and the book to explore language through words and paint. She has exhibited work both in the UK and in Europe and has been awarded the Bookartbookshop and London Centre for Book Arts awards.

Irving’s performance was made in response to dialogue with newsagents in Plymouth. Reflecting on the EU Referendum, the artist aimed to listen and connect with people in the city. Irving constructed her own book fair structure from found furniture to display painted texts captured from her research.

Fox Irving is an artist who graduated from Camberwell College of Art. She works with the page and the book to explore language through words and paint. She has exhibited work both in the UK and in Europe and has been awarded the Bookartbookshop and London Centre for Book Arts awards.

In My Own Words 2015

In My Own Words 2015

A common theme that has emerged and developed throughout my MA is the use of appropriation and copying within my work. The addictiveness of this process, and the insistent nature of the language used, I found could be linked with the insistent process of book production and reproduction.

For the final show I have now taken this a step further and moved into live performance.

Every day of the show I will be performing this insistent process by bringing my studio into the gallery space and creating my own production line. Viewers will not know whether it is Fox performing or an impostor. In doing this I can play and swap my gender and in a way become genderless.

My subject matter is very much political at the moment, and has taken a contemporary anarchic twist; let’s just say I am not afraid of the C word.

The performance will begin as soon as I wake up in the morning and make my commute to college from Brighton. I will collect a stack of Metro newspapers from Peckham Rye station and bring them into college with me. I will then proceed to work on the newspapers; be it with household paint, Chinese ink to a Sharpie, all indicative of what medium I fancy using that day.

I will be appropriating text from radio broadcasts, a pile of books and from the Internet (wasting time).

Then at the end of the day, I will collect my metros and put them back into the stands at Peckham Rye and back into circulation. I am fascinated by the life span of the London newspapers and how quickly the news in them becomes old news and discarded, and the thought, who really remembers what they have read in the metro that morning?

Studio Work 2016

Studio Work 2016

ASC The Chaplin Centre

Taplow House, Thurlow Street
London, SE17 2DG UK

UN Climate Summit 2015

UN Climate Summit 2015

On 9th December 2015, hundreds took part in simultaneous protest performances inside and outside the Louvre Museum, calling on it to drop its oil company sponsors Eni and Total.


This action marks the first international collaboration between a number of artist-activist groups working to liberate museums and cultural institutions around the world from ties to fossil fuel companies. This new and rapidly growing movement for a #FossilFreeCulture extends the divestment movement into the cultural sphere, calling on cultural institutions to cancel fossil fuel sponsorship contracts, divest financial holdings in the industry, and kick oil executives and climate deniers off their boards. Campaigners argue that fossil fuel companies sponsor museums and galleries in order to cleanse their tarnished brands and gain a 'social licence' to operate, to keep drilling and mining. 

Credit Kristian Buus. 2015
 

Studio Work 2016

Studio Work 2016

ASC The Chaplin Centre

Taplow House, Thurlow Street
London, SE17 2DG UK

ZAC.jpg
Studio Work 2016

Studio Work 2016

ASC The Chaplin Centre

Taplow House, Thurlow Street
London, SE17 2DG UK

In My Own Words 2015

In My Own Words 2015

A common theme that has emerged and developed throughout my MA is the use of appropriation and copying within my work. The addictiveness of this process, and the insistent nature of the language used, I found could be linked with the insistent process of book production and reproduction.

For the final show I have now taken this a step further and moved into live performance.

Every day of the show I will be performing this insistent process by bringing my studio into the gallery space and creating my own production line. Viewers will not know whether it is Fox performing or an impostor. In doing this I can play and swap my gender and in a way become genderless.

My subject matter is very much political at the moment, and has taken a contemporary anarchic twist; let’s just say I am not afraid of the C word.

The performance will begin as soon as I wake up in the morning and make my commute to college from Brighton. I will collect a stack of Metro newspapers from Peckham Rye station and bring them into college with me. I will then proceed to work on the newspapers; be it with household paint, Chinese ink to a Sharpie, all indicative of what medium I fancy using that day.

I will be appropriating text from radio broadcasts, a pile of books and from the Internet (wasting time).

Then at the end of the day, I will collect my metros and put them back into the stands at Peckham Rye and back into circulation. I am fascinated by the life span of the London newspapers and how quickly the news in them becomes old news and discarded, and the thought, who really remembers what they have read in the metro that morning?

UN Climate Summit 2015

UN Climate Summit 2015

On 9th December 2015, hundreds took part in simultaneous protest performances inside and outside the Louvre Museum, calling on it to drop its oil company sponsors Eni and Total.


This action marks the first international collaboration between a number of artist-activist groups working to liberate museums and cultural institutions around the world from ties to fossil fuel companies. This new and rapidly growing movement for a #FossilFreeCulture extends the divestment movement into the cultural sphere, calling on cultural institutions to cancel fossil fuel sponsorship contracts, divest financial holdings in the industry, and kick oil executives and climate deniers off their boards. Campaigners argue that fossil fuel companies sponsor museums and galleries in order to cleanse their tarnished brands and gain a 'social licence' to operate, to keep drilling and mining. 

Credit Kristian Buus. 2015
 

ZAC2.jpg
In My Own Words 2015

In My Own Words 2015

A common theme that has emerged and developed throughout my MA is the use of appropriation and copying within my work. The addictiveness of this process, and the insistent nature of the language used, I found could be linked with the insistent process of book production and reproduction.

For the final show I have now taken this a step further and moved into live performance.

Every day of the show I will be performing this insistent process by bringing my studio into the gallery space and creating my own production line. Viewers will not know whether it is Fox performing or an impostor. In doing this I can play and swap my gender and in a way become genderless.

My subject matter is very much political at the moment, and has taken a contemporary anarchic twist; let’s just say I am not afraid of the C word.

The performance will begin as soon as I wake up in the morning and make my commute to college from Brighton. I will collect a stack of Metro newspapers from Peckham Rye station and bring them into college with me. I will then proceed to work on the newspapers; be it with household paint, Chinese ink to a Sharpie, all indicative of what medium I fancy using that day.

I will be appropriating text from radio broadcasts, a pile of books and from the Internet (wasting time).

Then at the end of the day, I will collect my metros and put them back into the stands at Peckham Rye and back into circulation. I am fascinated by the life span of the London newspapers and how quickly the news in them becomes old news and discarded, and the thought, who really remembers what they have read in the metro that morning?

Studio Work 2016

Studio Work 2016

ASC The Chaplin Centre

Taplow House, Thurlow Street
London, SE17 2DG UK

UN Climate Summit 2015

UN Climate Summit 2015

On 9th December 2015, hundreds took part in simultaneous protest performances inside and outside the Louvre Museum, calling on it to drop its oil company sponsors Eni and Total.


This action marks the first international collaboration between a number of artist-activist groups working to liberate museums and cultural institutions around the world from ties to fossil fuel companies. This new and rapidly growing movement for a #FossilFreeCulture extends the divestment movement into the cultural sphere, calling on cultural institutions to cancel fossil fuel sponsorship contracts, divest financial holdings in the industry, and kick oil executives and climate deniers off their boards. Campaigners argue that fossil fuel companies sponsor museums and galleries in order to cleanse their tarnished brands and gain a 'social licence' to operate, to keep drilling and mining. 

Credit Kristian Buus. 2015
 

Studio Work 2016

Studio Work 2016

ASC The Chaplin Centre

Taplow House, Thurlow Street
London, SE17 2DG UK

Studio Work 2016

Studio Work 2016

ASC The Chaplin Centre

Taplow House, Thurlow Street
London, SE17 2DG UK

In My Own Words 2015

In My Own Words 2015

A common theme that has emerged and developed throughout my MA is the use of appropriation and copying within my work. The addictiveness of this process, and the insistent nature of the language used, I found could be linked with the insistent process of book production and reproduction.

For the final show I have now taken this a step further and moved into live performance.

Every day of the show I will be performing this insistent process by bringing my studio into the gallery space and creating my own production line. Viewers will not know whether it is Fox performing or an impostor. In doing this I can play and swap my gender and in a way become genderless.

My subject matter is very much political at the moment, and has taken a contemporary anarchic twist; let’s just say I am not afraid of the C word.

The performance will begin as soon as I wake up in the morning and make my commute to college from Brighton. I will collect a stack of Metro newspapers from Peckham Rye station and bring them into college with me. I will then proceed to work on the newspapers; be it with household paint, Chinese ink to a Sharpie, all indicative of what medium I fancy using that day.

I will be appropriating text from radio broadcasts, a pile of books and from the Internet (wasting time).

Then at the end of the day, I will collect my metros and put them back into the stands at Peckham Rye and back into circulation. I am fascinated by the life span of the London newspapers and how quickly the news in them becomes old news and discarded, and the thought, who really remembers what they have read in the metro that morning?

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

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Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

IMG_9960.jpg
Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

IMG_9961.jpg
Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Studio Work 2015 Book Objects

Camberwell College of Arts 

University of the Arts, London

45-65 Peckham Rd, London SE5 8UF

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.

 

One and Three Tweets 2015

One and Three Tweets 2015

 

One and Three Tweets, Freddy Gallery, Baltimore

Last fall, Irving started a Twitter account (@OnBeingKennyG) posting images of her hand-­drawn renderings of every tweet that Goldsmith posted from his own twitter account (@kg_ubu). Goldsmith, known for his ideas of uncreative writing, is an advocate for plagiarism and identity ­theft in the digital age. By hand-­rendering every tweet Goldsmith made, Irving celebrated, critiqued, and perpetuated Goldsmith’s stream of provocations.

The show takes its title from Joseph Kosuth’s seminal 1965 work, One and Three Chairs, in which three representations of a chair are presented side-­by-­side: a real chair, a photograph of a chair, and a dictionary definition of a chair. Similarly, for their exhibition, Goldsmith and Irving will present three representations of a tweet: Goldsmith’s original tweet, Irving’s original drawing of Goldsmith’s tweet, and Irving’s tweet of her drawing. Taking Kosuth’s provocation into the digital age, their collaboration questions ideas of visual representation in the twenty-­first century.

The exhibition will feature twenty-­two sets of three images, selected by the twenty­two most popular tweets on Irving’s feed. 

Kenneth Goldsmith is a poet who lives in New York. In 2012, he was named the Museum of Modern Art’s first poet laureate. He is the founding editor of UbuWeb (ubu.com).

Fox Irving is pursuing a MA in Visual Arts at Camberwell College of Art, University of the Arts in London.